I am a graduate student in public health; this is my blog about epidemiology, an awesome subject in public health that affects everything we do. I will be posting pictures and thoughts about current happenings in the public health world, as well as answering prompts for my class every once in a while.

"This blog was created for a graduate-level epidemiology project and does not officially represent the views of the University, professor, or other related entity.”

My personal blog is, if you're interested is mindgamesofnoconsequence.tumblr.com.

  1.   forbes:

How have vaccines changed the world? Using data from the Centers for Disease Control, graphic designer Leon Farrant created this awesome graphic that drives home what the data all means.
Check out more of Farrant’s work here. 

    Full image link →

    forbes:

    How have vaccines changed the world? Using data from the Centers for Disease Control, graphic designer Leon Farrant created this awesome graphic that drives home what the data all means.

    Check out more of Farrant’s work here

    (via ah-thenah)

    Source: forbes.com

  2.  

    This is a wonderful video that describes the need for single-payer healthcare, and how we can do this in the USA.

  3.   And these are all the reasons we should encourage cities and towns to put in bicycle lanes instead of building new roads (or in addition to new roads).

    Full image link →

    And these are all the reasons we should encourage cities and towns to put in bicycle lanes instead of building new roads (or in addition to new roads).

    (via piertotum-locomottor)

    Source: my-teen-quote

  4.   somecaryatid:

May is Preeclampsia Awareness month. 
I know, it’s still April. But my younger sister died in May two years ago from preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome. She had symptoms for weeks and nobody really took them seriously at first, including her. She never liked to bother anyone, and they’re so similar to the normal aches and pains of pregnancy that women overlook them or shrug them off as normal. My sister died twelve hours after she collapsed, and ever since then I meet women who say, “I had no idea it could be so serious.” 
Well, it can. Each year, women like my sister die from preeclampsia, and many, many more lose babies to it. If you or a pregnant friend have these symptoms, it’s better to be safe than sorry. Don’t wait, just call.
Awareness does matter. It’d mean a lot to me if you’d reblog this, thanks.

    Full image link →

    somecaryatid:

    May is Preeclampsia Awareness month. 

    I know, it’s still April. But my younger sister died in May two years ago from preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome. She had symptoms for weeks and nobody really took them seriously at first, including her. She never liked to bother anyone, and they’re so similar to the normal aches and pains of pregnancy that women overlook them or shrug them off as normal. My sister died twelve hours after she collapsed, and ever since then I meet women who say, “I had no idea it could be so serious.” 

    Well, it can. Each year, women like my sister die from preeclampsia, and many, many more lose babies to it. If you or a pregnant friend have these symptoms, it’s better to be safe than sorry. Don’t wait, just call.

    Awareness does matter. It’d mean a lot to me if you’d reblog this, thanks.

    (via ah-thenah)

    Source: somecaryatid

  5.  

    femininefreak:

    Sex Education in American Public Schools

    This is the state of sex education in America, and it needs to change. Everyone should have access to quality sex education that includes positive, healthy relationship modeling (that is all-inclusive) and medically accurate, reliable information about contraception and abstinence. This should also include education about abortion and how to access an abortion in your state. Not enough young people are getting this information from reliable sources, and it is something we can, and need to, change.

    (via invega-sustenna)

    Source: femininefreak

  6.  

    Mental Health Groups Split on Bill to Overhaul Care →

    Mental health is something that is not often looked at in Congress, so I applaud them for considering much needed reform on mental health. The bill does need some review and input from many other people and groups.

  7.  

    The myth of the entitled single mother remains as relevant as ever →

    I have been a single mother, and relied on public programs such as food stamps and childcare assistance in order to make it. I went to school full-time, worked full-time, and took care of my girls full-time, so I understand the struggle and this article speaks to me on an emotional level.

    It is something that is extremely important and relevant to public health. When single mothers, and indeed all mothers, are educated and receive the resources they need, they are able to provide the right type of care to their children, which helps future generations thrive. Poverty is an extremely important public health issue, but is also a very complicated issue that will take many people to address. And it needs to be addressed very soon.

  8.  

    txchnologist:

    Smart Solution To Stop Needle Reuse Wins Design Impact Award

    Healthcare providers reusing unsterilized syringes and needles cause more than 1.3 million infections around the world every year, according to the World Health Organization. Ignorance of the dangers and a lack of supplies means that the average syringe is reused four times in the developing world, says advocacy and education charity Safepoint

    The problem, which spreads bloodborne pathogens like hepatitis and AIDS HIV (h/t and good catch to sexeducationforprudes), led healthcare designer David Swann and his team at the University of Huddersfield in the United Kingdom to come up with a simple and cheap visual aid. 

    They created a syringe coated with a color-changing dye that turns red when exposed to carbon dioxide. The so-called A Behavior-Changing (ABC) syringe is stored in a nitrogen-filled pack and starts changing color only when the pack is punctured or the syringe is removed. Read more below and see the video.

    Read More

    (via vetstudent-microbiologymaniac)

    Source: txchnologist

  9.   bronzebasilisk:

blu-thoth:

meta-bubbles:

DO NOT GIVE OR GET ANY VACCINATIONS FOR YOURSELF OR  YOUR KIDS………..

Ok, lets break this down nice and simple.
Formaldehyde is from the purification of the vaccine. 99.9% of which is removed. The reason it doesn’t give a dosage is so minuscule that it can’t be measured without going into picograms. That’s one trillionth of a gram. You breathe in more formaldehyde by driving down a busy road than in a vaccine.
Thimerosal is NOT elemental mercury, It is a molecular compound made up of carbon, hydrogen, mercury, sodium, oxygen, and surfer. This is used as a preservative for the vaccine. Thimerosal is used in a variety of other things, like tattoo ink, facial creams, nasal sprays. It’s toxic to humans only in fairly large quantities but highly toxic to aquatic born organisms like infectious bacteria. In short, it makes sure you don’t get salmonella from a stray bacteria from the chicken embryos.As for the dosage of the Thimerosal. That is the most laughable point in this post. It says 25 mcg, that’s micrograms, or one millionth of a gram. To put this in perspective, a dollar bill weighs roughly 1 gram, the average human eyelash is around 80-90 micrograms. The box also says that it contains a 5ml (milliliter/cc) vial which leads me to my next point.
A little simple math and we find out that 25 mcg = 0.00003 ml and a little more math we find that 0.00003 ml is 0.00006% of 5 ml. Let me put this another way. By the age of 5, an American child weighs about 50-55lbs and their body contains 55 mcg of Uranium. I don’t see any kids running around with radiation sickness, so I think they’re safe with a preservative in them.TL;DR: This is like saying you don’t want your child eating their baked birthday cake because raw eggs were used to make it and you don’t want your child getting salmonella from it.

THANK YOU

    Full image link →

    bronzebasilisk:

    blu-thoth:

    meta-bubbles:

    DO NOT GIVE OR GET ANY VACCINATIONS FOR YOURSELF OR  YOUR KIDS………..

    Ok, lets break this down nice and simple.

    Formaldehyde is from the purification of the vaccine. 99.9% of which is removed. The reason it doesn’t give a dosage is so minuscule that it can’t be measured without going into picograms. That’s one trillionth of a gram. You breathe in more formaldehyde by driving down a busy road than in a vaccine.

    Thimerosal is NOT elemental mercury, It is a molecular compound made up of carbon, hydrogen, mercury, sodium, oxygen, and surfer. This is used as a preservative for the vaccine. Thimerosal is used in a variety of other things, like tattoo ink, facial creams, nasal sprays. It’s toxic to humans only in fairly large quantities but highly toxic to aquatic born organisms like infectious bacteria. In short, it makes sure you don’t get salmonella from a stray bacteria from the chicken embryos.

    As for the dosage of the Thimerosal. That is the most laughable point in this post. It says 25 mcg, that’s micrograms, or one millionth of a gram. To put this in perspective, a dollar bill weighs roughly 1 gram, the average human eyelash is around 80-90 micrograms. The box also says that it contains a 5ml (milliliter/cc) vial which leads me to my next point.

    A little simple math and we find out that 25 mcg = 0.00003 ml and a little more math we find that 0.00003 ml is 0.00006% of 5 ml. Let me put this another way. By the age of 5, an American child weighs about 50-55lbs and their body contains 55 mcg of Uranium. I don’t see any kids running around with radiation sickness, so I think they’re safe with a preservative in them.

    TL;DR: This is like saying you don’t want your child eating their baked birthday cake because raw eggs were used to make it and you don’t want your child getting salmonella from it.

    THANK YOU

    (via science-sexual)

    Source: meta-bubbles

  10.   Primary care is an essential, yet underrated part of the US Healthcare system. More and more medical students are choosing specialties in order to be able to pay off their student debts. Programs such as the National Health Service Corps, which provides scholarships to students with interests in primary care, are constantly in threat of funding cuts. Reach out to your legislators and make it known that these programs are extremely important and should not be facing funding cuts.

    Full image link →

    Primary care is an essential, yet underrated part of the US Healthcare system. More and more medical students are choosing specialties in order to be able to pay off their student debts. Programs such as the National Health Service Corps, which provides scholarships to students with interests in primary care, are constantly in threat of funding cuts. Reach out to your legislators and make it known that these programs are extremely important and should not be facing funding cuts.